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Open Access Editorial

Everest 60 years on: what next?

Michael PW Grocott1234* and Denny ZH Levett45

Author Affiliations

1 Integrative Physiology and Critical Illness Group, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Sir Henry Wellcome Laboratories, Faculty of Medicine University of Southampton, Mailpoint 810, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK

2 Anaesthesia and Critical Care Research Unit, Mailpoint 27, D Level, Centre Block, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK

3 NIHR Southampton Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Southampton Centre for Biomedical Research, MP218, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK

4 UCL Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme Environment Medicine, Portex Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK

5 NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7DN, UK

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Extreme Physiology & Medicine 2013, 2:20  doi:10.1186/2046-7648-2-20

Published: 6 June 2013

First paragraph (this article has no abstract)

On 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hilary stood on the 8,848 m (29,029 ft) summit of Mount Everest, finally demonstrating that humans could overcome the physical and mental challenges required to conquer the world’s highest peak. The 60th anniversary of this event is sadly the first with no member of the original expedition alive, since the death of George Lowe on 20 March 2013 at the age of 89 [1].

Keywords:
Altitude; Hypoxia; Everest; Sherpa; Critical care